Can I live here?

(Source: loulunatik, via yukidoll)

dendroica:

Richard Feynman ‘The beauty of a flower’ by zenpencils on Tumblr

It’s also worth noting that there is some overlap between science and the visual arts in the form of scientific illustration, some of which involves a good deal of creativity. This doesn’t just go for science, either. Learning more about almost any subject can add new ways of appreciating it on both aesthetic and deeper levels.

(Source: zenpencils.com, via scientificillustration)

Insectorvm Sive Minimorum Animalium Theatrvm
by Thomas Moffett
I can’t find any information on the artist who did the beautiful illustrations. If you find it please message me and I will fix the post and add credit. 
You can Buy it here If you happen have $13,000 that is. 

Insectorvm Sive Minimorum Animalium Theatrvm

by Thomas Moffett

I can’t find any information on the artist who did the beautiful illustrations. If you find it please message me and I will fix the post and add credit. 

You can Buy it here If you happen have $13,000 that is. 

Tags: Other stuff

medicalillustration:

I’ve been asked "why?" I chose BMC many times. I love explaining it to people - but only if they’re genuinely interested. Some people start off with a condescending tone: this doesn’t bother me. What BOTHERS me is that I’m hoping to open their perception on the subject, but they refuse the…

thebrainscoop:

The Brain Scoop
Moths vs. Butterflies

The world of invertebrates is one that’s largely foreign to me, coming from a collection that was primarily birds and mammals. It really didn’t take very long (like, an entire half second) for me to become completely engrossed in insects as soon as possible upon my arrival at The Field Museum. Jim Boone, the insects collections manager, has been more than happy to share a tiny fraction of their 4.1 million pinned insects with me (the alcohol collection includes another 8.3 million insects [!!!!!!!]). 

Moth and butterfly identification can be tricky if you don’t know what you’re looking for, but once you’ve got a handle on the basics you’d be surprised at how quickly you can call them out! 

lucienballard:

New Imaging Technology Shows Python Digesting a Rat.

 

Using a combination of computer tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), scientists Kasper Hansen and Henrik Lauridsen of Aarhus University in Denmark were able to visualize the entire internal organ structures and vascular systems (aka “guts”) of a Burmese Python digesting a rat.


By choosing the right settings for contrast and light intensity during the scanning process, the scientists were able to highlight specific organs and make them appear in different colors. The non-invasive CT and MRI scans could let scientists look at animal anatomy without the need for other invasive methods such as dissections.

 

above shows a Burmese Python scanned before ingesting a rat and then at two, 16, 24, 32, 48, 72 and 132 hours after dinner. The succession of images reveals a gradual disappearance of the rat’s body, accompanied by an overall expansion of the snake’s intestine, shrinking of the gallbladder and a 25 percent increase in heart volume.

 

Source:  Aarhus University

(via scientificillustration)

Ghetie’s Atlas of Avian Anatomy is book with beautiful illustrations and is available for download on the page linked below. 
Link

Ghetie’s Atlas of Avian Anatomy is book with beautiful illustrations and is available for download on the page linked below. 

Link

mucholderthen:

COMPARATIVE MAMMALIAN ANATOMY - 1860

Benjamin Waterhouse Hawkins
A comparative view of the human and animal frame 
Chapman and Hall, 1860
________________________________

Ten plates with brief explanatory text intended 'to give a comparative view of the variation in form of the bony skeleton or framework of those animals most frequently required by the artist, designer, or ornamentist.”

It appears that Waterhouse Hawkins, who is best known for his work with dinosaurs (here and here), wanted to make the illustrations as realistic as possible. All are depicted next to Homo sapiens, who is posed in ways the illustrator apparently felt were natural: a man leads a horse, gives a treat to his camel, shows off his elephant, and [perhaps] supplicates a king attended by the king of beasts.

The textual explanations of variation in animal form did not yet reflect the influence of Charles Darwin’s evolutionary theory, but the detailed illustrations added much to the understanding of mammalian anatomy.

(Images and text [revised here] via University of Wisconsin Digital Collections)
________________________________

Benjamin Waterhouse Hawkins in Wikipedia  
Wikipedia on history of dinosaur study

(via scientificillustration)

thebrainscoop:

cacajao:

Hosenose, Part Two (by thebrainscoop)

I do enjoy some nice viscera.

I didn’t get a chance to post this yesterday because as soon as it went up Michael and I were in the back of a Jeep on our way to collect insects in Hanover, Illinois. 

In this episode, the Grossometer goes to HOLY F*** but I’ll let you decide for yourself whether you think that’s appropriate!